Fashion & Textiles on view in California and the West

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I recently received a note from a reader, describing her trouble finding information on upcoming fashion and textile exhibitions on view in California. So, I thought I’d share what I know with readers. Quite a variety of exhibits are available across the western states: exhibitions of film costumes, exhibits using old techniques in new ways (embroidery and knitting), historical design aesthetics (including ‘California’ design and the Aesthetic movement), as well as contemporary body art (tattoos!). Quite the range to choose from. Please feel free to comment if you’ve been to any of these or others you think readers should know about:

20th Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design
Through April 28, 2012
The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising/Museum & Galleries (Los Angeles, CA)

The FIDM Museum is proud to present the twentieth anniversary Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition. Celebrating the art and industry of costume designers, this exhibition will present more than 100 costumes from twenty films released in 2011. The exhibition includes selected costumes from all five 2011 Academy Award® Nominees for Costume Design: W/E, Hugo, Jane Eyre, The Artist, and Anonymous. The exhibition also showcases classic film costumes from the FIDM Museum collection and the Department of Recreation and Parks, City of Los Angeles, Historic Hollywood Collection. Some of these same costumes were featured during the first Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition in 1993.

Common Places: Printing, Embroidery, and the Art of Global Mapping
Through May 13, 2012
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles)

Common Places features three objects from LACMA’s permanent collection which transform printed works on paper into one-of-a-kind embroideries: a seventeenth-century valance, a cigarette silks quilt, and Alighiero Boetti’s Mappa. The resulting textiles articulate contemporary aspects of global phenomena and suggest that far from being a recent development, globalization has deep historical roots that extended into the home and everyday life.

California Design, 1930–1965: “Living in a Modern Way”
Through June 3, 2012
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Los Angeles)

This exhibition is the first major study of California midcentury modern design. With more than 300 objects—furniture, ceramics, metalwork, fashion and textiles, and industrial and graphic design—the exhibition examines the state’s role in shaping the material culture of the entire country. Organized into four thematic areas, the exhibition aims to elucidate the 1951 quote from émigré Greta Magnusson Grossman that is incorporated into the exhibition’s title: California design “is not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions…It has developed out of our own preferences for living in a modern way.”

The Art of the Anatolian Kilim: Highlights from the McCoy Jones Collection
de Young Museum (San Francisco)
Through June 10, 2012

A world-class collection of Anatolian kilims given to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco by H. McCoy Jones and his wife, Caroline, is showcased in a choice exhibition of two dozen of the finest examples. Presented in the textile arts gallery at the de Young, the Anatolian flat-woven kilims on view, dating from the 15th to the 19th century, include a variety of design types and regional styles, as well as superb examples of artistic and visual prowess. The kilims in the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco’s permanent collection are considered the most important group of Anatolian kilims outside Turkey.

Knitted, Knotted, Twisted & Twined: The Jewelry of Mary Lee Hu
Through  June 17, 2012
Bellevue Arts Museum (Bellevue, WA)

Over the past 40 years, Mary Lee Hu has affirmed her distinctive voice in the world of jewelry with her elegant, voluptuous creations. Using wire the way hand weavers use thread, Hu has blazed a trail as both artist and innovator, exploring the nexus between metalsmithing and textile techniques. Keen to metal’s ability to bend and manipulate light within a textured surface, Hu’s work is a testament to her sophisticated eye for weightless and rhythmic lines, translated into body adornment. Featuring more than 90 exquisite earrings, rings, brooches and neckpieces drawn from public and private collections internationally, this retrospective traces Hu’s evolution from her experimental designs of the 1960s to today’s creations full of light and movement.

The Cult of Beauty: The Victorian Avant-Garde, 1860–1900
Through June 17, 2012
Legion of Honor (San Francisco)

The Cult of Beauty: The Victorian Avant-Garde, 1860–1900 is the first major exhibition to explore the unconventional creativity of the British Aesthetic Movement, tracing the evolution of this movement from a small circle of progressive artists and poets, through the achievements of innovative painters and architects, to its broad impact on fashion and the middle-class home. The superb artworks on view encompass the manifold forms of Victorian material culture: the traditional high art of painting, fashionable trends in architecture and interior decoration, handmade and manufactured furnishings for the “artistic” home, art photography and the new modes of dress.

Order and Border
Through Oct. 21, 2012
Seattle Art Museum (Seattle, WA)

Stripes are a fundamental visual element, appearing naturally in vertical lines as trees and in manmade products of all kinds, from street dividers to ornate fabrics. The stripe is so basic it is rarely given isolated attention. This installation examines how stripes decorate and structure objects, bodies and spaces. It follows the many ways that stripes are formulated—swirling, rigid, ragged, skinny or bold—and shows how they appear in a wide range of media from a multitude of cultures. These objects help us recognize the range of meanings that a stripe holds, from a minor design feature to the sign of a significant mythic journey.

Indelibly Yours: Smith Andersen Editions and the Tattoo Project
de Saisset Museum, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA
February 24 – March 18 and April 13 – July 1, 2012

Featuring work by ten artists—five known for tattoo and five known for printmaking—Indelibly Yours explores the kinship between marking on skin and the practice of drawing on a printing plate.

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1 Comment

  1. Perhaps readers would be interested in these exhibits in Long Beach.
    and wonder if your readers would be interested in the following:

    Small Expressions 2012
    May 10 – August 12, 2012, at the Long Beach Museum of Art, Long Beach, California

    Juror: Carol Shaw-Sutton, Chair of the Fiber Program, California State University, Long Beach.
    Small Expressions is an annual international juried exhibit sponsored by the Handweavers Guild of America, Inc., to showcase fiber art on a small scale, not to exceed 15 inches (38cm) in any direction.

    Pacific Currents Fashion Show
    Wednesday, July 18, 2012 – 8:00 pm, Terrace Theater, Long Beach Performing Arts Center.
    Convergence® 2012 Long Beach presents a spectacular runway fashion show featuring wearable art selected from fiber artists from around the world. Jurors Anne Bennion and Dawn Marie Forsyth will present awards after the show. Fashions will be on display at the Long Beach Convention Center July 19 – 21, 2012.

    Longitude An international juried exhibit featuring lengths of constructed or embellished yardage.
    Juror: Kay Faulkner
    Long Beach Convention Center July 19 – 21, 2012.

    Latitude International juried exhibit open to work created using any fiber arts technique.
    Juror: Aaron Kramer
    Long Beach Convention Center July 19 – 21, 2012.

    More info — http://www.weavespindye.org/?loc=8-00-00

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